chicagoscreenshots:

Chicago Pride Parade, Belmont/Halsted, 1977 (via

maptacular:

A 1931 Cartoon Map of “Chicago’s Gangland,” Brimming With Wry, Macabre Details
“This “Gangland” map of Chicago, published by the firm Bruce-Roberts Inc. in 1931, cloaks itself in moral purpose, trumpeting that it’s “Designed to Inculcate the Most Important Principles of Piety and Virtue in Young Persons and Graphically Portray the Evils and Sin of Large Cities.” Despite that virtuous cover story, the map is pure fun, full of comic-book vernacular, ironic commentary, and references to true crimes of the recent past.

Antiquarian bookseller Elizabeth Burdon writes that the iconic Wonderground Mapof the London Underground, created by MacDonald Gill in 1913, influenced map-makers in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. Burdon calls this type of map a “Wonder Map”: a pictorial production, suffused with whimsy and color, that brings together text and image with a liberal dose of humor. These cartoon “wonder maps” were quick to sell. They weren’t meant to be used for navigation so much as for souvenirs, to be brought home, displayed, and enjoyed.”
via Slate’s Vault

maptacular:

A 1931 Cartoon Map of “Chicago’s Gangland,” Brimming With Wry, Macabre Details

This “Gangland” map of Chicago, published by the firm Bruce-Roberts Inc. in 1931, cloaks itself in moral purpose, trumpeting that it’s “Designed to Inculcate the Most Important Principles of Piety and Virtue in Young Persons and Graphically Portray the Evils and Sin of Large Cities.” Despite that virtuous cover story, the map is pure fun, full of comic-book vernacular, ironic commentary, and references to true crimes of the recent past.

Antiquarian bookseller Elizabeth Burdon writes that the iconic Wonderground Mapof the London Underground, created by MacDonald Gill in 1913, influenced map-makers in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. Burdon calls this type of map a “Wonder Map”: a pictorial production, suffused with whimsy and color, that brings together text and image with a liberal dose of humor. These cartoon “wonder maps” were quick to sell. They weren’t meant to be used for navigation so much as for souvenirs, to be brought home, displayed, and enjoyed.”

via Slate’s Vault

jasmined:

#jackyourbody @chosenfewdjs (at Daley plaza)

The Chosen Few DJs played Daley Plaza today in advance of The 24th Annual Old School Picnic, which they will host next Saturday, July 5th in Jackson Park at 63rd & Hayes. Buy tickets here.

(via Homes of the Chicago Famous | Cape Horn Illustration)
thisistheglamorous:

While I’m not a big fan of the idea of a “Lucas Museum”, I am a big fan of this picture.

thisistheglamorous:

While I’m not a big fan of the idea of a “Lucas Museum”, I am a big fan of this picture.

jasmined:

Nothing I like better than dancing to house music in my finest business casual attire.
For serious, though, I went to this last summer and it was fun. Come on down! We’ll get ice cream afterwards.

jasmined:

Nothing I like better than dancing to house music in my finest business casual attire.

For serious, though, I went to this last summer and it was fun. Come on down! We’ll get ice cream afterwards.

The force is with you, Chicago
calumet412:

Lonely day at North Ave Beach, 1956, Chicago.

calumet412:

Lonely day at North Ave Beach, 1956, Chicago.

The nonprofit Greater Than AIDS has teamed up with Walgreens around the city to provide free HIV testing as part of National HIV Testing Day on June 27.

For the most part, 27 stores will offer the testing on June 26-27 from 3-7 p.m., and on June 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Vanity Fair sums up our city leader this way: “With a predilection for luxe fabrics and a salt-and-pepper ’do, Rahm Emanuel combines suave styling with a populist sensibility. Perhaps, no politician wears the navy suit better. His ties are slowly making their way through the blue section of the Pantone color chart.”