teamvocalo:

Vocalo está buscando 8 personas que sirvan de voz a las comunidades marginadas. Las clases serán instruidas en parte por profesionales de radio de nuestra estación hermana WBEZ 91.5FM y por Rocío Santos de Domingos en español, quien guiara la clase y proveerá asistencia editorial. El taller tomara lugar en nuestra espacio en la Villita localizado en 2710 W. Cermak Ave, cada sábado de 10am-2pm. 

La fecha límite para solicitar al taller de Vocalo es el 30 de julio a las 12PM. Los participantes seleccionados serán notificados el viernes, 1ro de agosto. 

Haz clic aquí»>Taller de producción radiofónica en español

calumet412:

Claes Oldgenburg’s proposal for a skyscraper on N Michigan Ave, next to the Hancock, in the form of Lorado Taft’s sculpture, Eternal Silence, 1968, Chicago.
Taft’s 1909 sculpture can be seen in Graceland Cemetery on the site of Dexter Graves’ burial plot.

That wouldn’t have been creepy at all.

calumet412:

Claes Oldgenburg’s proposal for a skyscraper on N Michigan Ave, next to the Hancock, in the form of Lorado Taft’s sculpture, Eternal Silence, 1968, Chicago.

Taft’s 1909 sculpture can be seen in Graceland Cemetery on the site of Dexter Graves’ burial plot.

That wouldn’t have been creepy at all.

The Hala Kahiki, located about six miles south of Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport in the suburb of River Grove, has caused more than one passing driver to do a double take, wondering how a weathered beach shack arrived on such a bland stretch of Midwestern road. In fact, much about the Hala Kahiki’s origins is serendipitous. The tiki theme was inspired by bamboo fencing that Oppedisano’s grandparents used to cover their shabby walls, and the name came from a comic strip. When the bar opened in 1966, the tiki fad that had swept American pop culture over the previous three decades had already peaked. Yet nearly 50 years later, the Hala Kahiki is one of the last true tiki bars left in the region.
Aloha from the Hala Kahiki — The Distance

The Hala Kahiki, located about six miles south of Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport in the suburb of River Grove, has caused more than one passing driver to do a double take, wondering how a weathered beach shack arrived on such a bland stretch of Midwestern road. In fact, much about the Hala Kahiki’s origins is serendipitous. The tiki theme was inspired by bamboo fencing that Oppedisano’s grandparents used to cover their shabby walls, and the name came from a comic strip. When the bar opened in 1966, the tiki fad that had swept American pop culture over the previous three decades had already peaked. Yet nearly 50 years later, the Hala Kahiki is one of the last true tiki bars left in the region.

Aloha from the Hala Kahiki — The Distance

Members of the religious group seek to maintain a close-knit rural lifestyle and, though there are Amish settlements sprinkled throughout the Midwest, the nearest one lies 90 miles from downtown Chicago. As we approached an answer — by checking in with experts and Amish travelers themselves — we couldn’t help but feel we were meeting our regional neighbors for the first time.

itscolossal:

A Triple Lightning Strike on Three of Chicago’s Tallest Buildings

Now in gif form!
chicagogeek:

Sky Ride Tap, Van Buren Street, Chicago.

chicagogeek:

Sky Ride Tap, Van Buren Street, Chicago.

In addition to the library itself, the designers envision an elevated park that would connect the campus to Lake Michigan, directly to the east. This would not only create a greenbelt of sorts connecting the city to Burnham Park along the water, it could potentially host research centers for urban farming and other environmental topics.
Here’s One Early Proposal For Obama’s Presidential Library In Chicago | Gizmodo

In addition to the library itself, the designers envision an elevated park that would connect the campus to Lake Michigan, directly to the east. This would not only create a greenbelt of sorts connecting the city to Burnham Park along the water, it could potentially host research centers for urban farming and other environmental topics.

Here’s One Early Proposal For Obama’s Presidential Library In Chicago | Gizmodo

maptacular:

A 1931 Cartoon Map of “Chicago’s Gangland,” Brimming With Wry, Macabre Details
“This “Gangland” map of Chicago, published by the firm Bruce-Roberts Inc. in 1931, cloaks itself in moral purpose, trumpeting that it’s “Designed to Inculcate the Most Important Principles of Piety and Virtue in Young Persons and Graphically Portray the Evils and Sin of Large Cities.” Despite that virtuous cover story, the map is pure fun, full of comic-book vernacular, ironic commentary, and references to true crimes of the recent past.

Antiquarian bookseller Elizabeth Burdon writes that the iconic Wonderground Mapof the London Underground, created by MacDonald Gill in 1913, influenced map-makers in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. Burdon calls this type of map a “Wonder Map”: a pictorial production, suffused with whimsy and color, that brings together text and image with a liberal dose of humor. These cartoon “wonder maps” were quick to sell. They weren’t meant to be used for navigation so much as for souvenirs, to be brought home, displayed, and enjoyed.”
via Slate’s Vault

maptacular:

A 1931 Cartoon Map of “Chicago’s Gangland,” Brimming With Wry, Macabre Details

This “Gangland” map of Chicago, published by the firm Bruce-Roberts Inc. in 1931, cloaks itself in moral purpose, trumpeting that it’s “Designed to Inculcate the Most Important Principles of Piety and Virtue in Young Persons and Graphically Portray the Evils and Sin of Large Cities.” Despite that virtuous cover story, the map is pure fun, full of comic-book vernacular, ironic commentary, and references to true crimes of the recent past.

Antiquarian bookseller Elizabeth Burdon writes that the iconic Wonderground Mapof the London Underground, created by MacDonald Gill in 1913, influenced map-makers in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. Burdon calls this type of map a “Wonder Map”: a pictorial production, suffused with whimsy and color, that brings together text and image with a liberal dose of humor. These cartoon “wonder maps” were quick to sell. They weren’t meant to be used for navigation so much as for souvenirs, to be brought home, displayed, and enjoyed.”

via Slate’s Vault

jasmined:

#jackyourbody @chosenfewdjs (at Daley plaza)

The Chosen Few DJs played Daley Plaza today in advance of The 24th Annual Old School Picnic, which they will host next Saturday, July 5th in Jackson Park at 63rd & Hayes. Buy tickets here.

(via Homes of the Chicago Famous | Cape Horn Illustration)