Oh yeah. And every time we did a take, he’d create a different joke. It was really challenging because he just coming up with so many fantastic ideas — he was just so funny. But the biggest challenge was when we were shooting, we actually had to keep a straight face because Robin would be so funny. Everyone would break character and just bust out laughing. There were even some takes where the camera man would laugh and the camera would shake. Robin would just waste film. He would ruin everything because he was so doggone funny.

Reginald Hudlin on the late great Chicago comedian Robin Harris.

Read more: TV One’s “Unsung: Hollywood” Features Late Comedian and Chicago Native Robin Harris


The main focus of the story to a large extent is — white American goes to help these black Haitians build a school. This idea of the white savior is a common theme, so as a filmmaker what do you have to be mindful of when this is partly the focus of your film?
JN: I think that’s our entry in, and I think we kind of want to use that as a crowbar to open up some of these bigger issues and say we’re also going to show you the other stories.
DS: In many ways we’re kind of telling the exact opposite of that story. If you look at the material and you look at the kind of story we’re going to tell, I think it’s very much a well-intentioned guy goes down and has the exact opposite experience. He does not necessarily do right by the community and I think we’re committed to being really honest about how that unfolds. So in many ways as filmmakers we’re not quite playing with that narrative convention but we’re kind of turning that narrative convention upside down.

Read more: How To Build A School In Haiti: An Interview with Jack Newell & Dinesh Sabu

The main focus of the story to a large extent is — white American goes to help these black Haitians build a school. This idea of the white savior is a common theme, so as a filmmaker what do you have to be mindful of when this is partly the focus of your film?

JN: I think that’s our entry in, and I think we kind of want to use that as a crowbar to open up some of these bigger issues and say we’re also going to show you the other stories.

DS: In many ways we’re kind of telling the exact opposite of that story. If you look at the material and you look at the kind of story we’re going to tell, I think it’s very much a well-intentioned guy goes down and has the exact opposite experience. He does not necessarily do right by the community and I think we’re committed to being really honest about how that unfolds. So in many ways as filmmakers we’re not quite playing with that narrative convention but we’re kind of turning that narrative convention upside down.

Read more: How To Build A School In Haiti: An Interview with Jack Newell & Dinesh Sabu


Sometimes, I look at these shows and I just laugh. The worst show — I can’t remember the name of it [I believe he’s referring to “Restaurant: Impossible”] — is with the crew-cut guy, I think he’s an ex-Marine. He’s got giant biceps and he’s barking at everyone, “You guys suck. We’re going to reinvent your restaurant.” Why is this a show? Because in reality, we’ve all known how to open a restaurant. When we did Next and Aviary, we came into a space that we knew we were going to totally renovate, but we did it in a more romantic fashion where we got six to eight key people who understood what we wanted to accomplish. It was a conversation. It wasn’t “I’m going to take a sledgehammer and blow out this wall!” Come on. I get that it makes for good TV and it pays everybody, but it would be nice if the dining and viewing public would be less interested in drama and more interested in true creativity.

Chef Grant Achatz on reality cooking shows, the new documentary Spinning Plates, his kids and more. Read it: More Interested in True Creativity: A Conversation with Grant Achatz
(Illustration by Dmitry Samarov)

Sometimes, I look at these shows and I just laugh. The worst show — I can’t remember the name of it [I believe he’s referring to “Restaurant: Impossible”] — is with the crew-cut guy, I think he’s an ex-Marine. He’s got giant biceps and he’s barking at everyone, “You guys suck. We’re going to reinvent your restaurant.” Why is this a show? Because in reality, we’ve all known how to open a restaurant. When we did Next and Aviary, we came into a space that we knew we were going to totally renovate, but we did it in a more romantic fashion where we got six to eight key people who understood what we wanted to accomplish. It was a conversation. It wasn’t “I’m going to take a sledgehammer and blow out this wall!” Come on. I get that it makes for good TV and it pays everybody, but it would be nice if the dining and viewing public would be less interested in drama and more interested in true creativity.

Chef Grant Achatz on reality cooking shows, the new documentary Spinning Plates, his kids and more. Read it: More Interested in True Creativity: A Conversation with Grant Achatz


(Illustration by Dmitry Samarov)


What’s the oddest/most interesting ingredient combo?
KP: It’s a moving target, always adapting and evolving. One of our insights was we learned you can intensify the flavor of blueberries if you cook them with cinnamon. Likewise, if you’re doing something with pumpkin. You want to make pumpkin taste even more like pumpkin? The secret is bay leaves.

Read more in Drive-Thru: The Flavor Matchmakers: Karen Page & Andrew Dornenburg

What’s the oddest/most interesting ingredient combo?

KP: It’s a moving target, always adapting and evolving. One of our insights was we learned you can intensify the flavor of blueberries if you cook them with cinnamon. Likewise, if you’re doing something with pumpkin. You want to make pumpkin taste even more like pumpkin? The secret is bay leaves.

Read more in Drive-Thru: The Flavor Matchmakers: Karen Page & Andrew Dornenburg

Did you know about the Old Town School of Folk Music growing up here?
I grew up in Marquette Park, which is like another world from where the Old Town School of Folk Music is. But I grew up listening to a lot of traditional Irish music and we had a player piano in the house, and I listened to a lot of older, Tin Pan Alley kind of music. Then I went to school at DePaul, and that’s when I became aware of the Old Town School of Folk Music. When I was up in Lincoln Park going to college, I had put together a lot of the old Irish music that I was listening to as a kid, and I noticed it was all being played at the Old Town School of Folk Music in the sixties and stuff. It was kind of a revelation.
Read more: Interview: Harmonizing with John C. Reilly at the Old Town School of Folk Music

Did you know about the Old Town School of Folk Music growing up here?

I grew up in Marquette Park, which is like another world from where the Old Town School of Folk Music is. But I grew up listening to a lot of traditional Irish music and we had a player piano in the house, and I listened to a lot of older, Tin Pan Alley kind of music. Then I went to school at DePaul, and that’s when I became aware of the Old Town School of Folk Music. When I was up in Lincoln Park going to college, I had put together a lot of the old Irish music that I was listening to as a kid, and I noticed it was all being played at the Old Town School of Folk Music in the sixties and stuff. It was kind of a revelation.

Read more: Interview: Harmonizing with John C. Reilly at the Old Town School of Folk Music

Pure Rubbish: An Interview with Writer/Director Brad Bischoff
"They popped up on MySpace. That’s how long ago it was." Bob Regan, aka Bryant Mumble, talks about becoming the voice of the Windy City Rollers.
Read more: The Evolution of Bryant Mumble

"They popped up on MySpace. That’s how long ago it was." Bob Regan, aka Bryant Mumble, talks about becoming the voice of the Windy City Rollers.

Read more: The Evolution of Bryant Mumble

When you were incarcerated, you became interested in theater after reading a book on black playwrights—was there a particular play or playwright that grabbed your attention?

"It was Douglas Turner Ward’s play, Day of Absence. It is a political satire that I thought was hilarious. Once, I was in "the hole" for six days and was allowed to take one book with me. I reached for a revolutionary book but I accidentally picked up this anthology of black playwrights. I read it and I said that when I got out of isolation, I was going to get the craziest guys I knew in the prison and start a drama group."

Family Zine Collaboration Yields Advice for Health and Happiness